Cockadilly

A collaboration between traditional and modern buildings and building techniques and materials

This project posed the challenge of creating a large, contemporary extension in contrast to an existing Cotswold stone house in order to increase the spaces available for a growing family in which to live day to day and to accommodate friends and family for regular social occasions. The spaces had to be both large enough for entertaining guests yet cosy and intimate for the family times. The large garden had to be accessible from the living areas and a decent sized boot room was included in the scheme to ensure the muddier days needn’t hinder the enjoyment of outdoors yet preserved the interior.

Our design ensured the occupants of the house are able to enjoy the far reaching vista. Vast expansive glass walls and sliding doors were incorporated to maximise the panoramic, south facing views over beech woods and down across the Ulley valley below.  

Both natural stone and larch wood was used on the new parts of the house with the deliberate aim of ensuring the new part blended into both the existing original aspect of the house as well as into the beautiful surrounding landscape. The result is a beautiful home which sits proudly on valley, it’s large glass walls reflecting the hues of the valley opposite so it stands proud but as local wood and stone age and weather it’s initial statement will become understated and it will sit quietly in its setting for generations to come. 

Ultimately this is a collaboration between traditional and modern buildings as well as building techniques and materials.

Photography: Quintin Lake

Project Challenges

Turning away from the busy road while making the most of the view

Ensuring the incredible view across the valley were a feature of the interior spaces

Convincing planners there would be minimal impact on the landscape

Putting emphasis on the scale and setting at conception stage and continuing to build a trusting relationship with the planners.

Ensuring the desire for using local, natural materials was met

Focusing on maximising sustainability and reducing carbon footprint for the build.

How We Met the Client’s Requirements

We designed contemporary elements to fix the building to its setting

Expanses of glass facing the valley allow for the incredible views to be fully seen from most rooms in the house.

We used materials that would blend with the setting

Large glass walls reflect the hues of the valley opposite so it stands proud but as local materials of  wood and stone age and weather, it’s initial statement will become understated and it will sit quietly in its setting for generations to come.

We married local, natural materials with the existing structure

Both natural stone and larch wood was used on the new parts of the house with the deliberate aim of ensuring the new part fused into both the existing original aspect of the house – as well as into the beautiful surrounding landscape.

Related Projects

Larch House

 A contemporary family home built using ‘Passivhaus’ technology.

Vale Farm
A contemporary Cotswold barn conversion of an informal cluster of agricultural buildings.
Dursley Treehouse

A treehouse built on a small plot in the centre of Dursley.

Millar + Howard Workshop

St Mary's Mill

Chalford

Stroud

GL6 8NX